Herdsa 2011

HERDSA 2011 program: Posters

Evaluation of peer assessment in long case clinical examinations
Annette Burgess, Kirsten Black, Christopher Roberts, Craig Mellis
Abstract
Student and lecturer evaluation of tablet PC use for biomedical science lectures
Julia Choate, George Kotsanas
Abstract
Development of an online role-play assessment initiative for nursing students in their bioscience studies
Judy Craft, Louise Ainscough
Abstract
Psychological literacy and adaptive cognition in a first-year university classroom
Jacquelyn Cranney, Sue Morris
Abstract
The Griffith PRO-Teaching Project: Sharing Ideas to Develop Capabilities with Peer Review and Observation of Teaching
Steve Drew
Abstract
Scoping evaluation of eLearning support in campus-based universities
Gregory Leahy, Mary-Helen Ward
Abstract
eBooks A key to greater accessibility
Andrew Lovell-Simons, Sharon Kerr
Abstract
New graduates negotiating the transition to work in international non-government organizations in Vietnam
Lan Mai
Abstract
Promoting academic integrity among students
Jennifer Martin, Karen van Haeringen
Abstract
Developing students' oral communication skills: Tutor and student resources for academic practice
Linda Murray
Abstract
Integrating research teaching and experience into graduate medical curriculum
Judy Mullan, Kathryn Weston, Peter McLennan, Warren Rich
Abstract
'Moving Forward' - A widening participation initiative for primary aged pupils
Carole Nairn, Lesley-Anne Holder
Abstract
The use of Optical Mark Recognition (OMR) software in assessment at Bond University
Jeremy Rogers, Linda Crane
Abstract
Indigenous students and accessibility
Roslyn Sackley, Judith Booth
Abstract
Predictors of dropout following the first semester of a nursing program
Yenna Salamonson, Lucie Ramjan, Lien Lombardo, Jane Koch
Abstract
Understanding and enhancing the experience of international learners and academic teaching staff
Julie Shaw, Creina Mitchell, Letitia Del Fabbro, Colleen Cuddihy
Abstract
Contextual influences associated with variation in conversations about teaching
Kate Thomson
Abstract
Collaborative collisions: Learning skills, information literacy and disciplines
Lynette Torres, Glen Croy, Susan Mayson, Leanne McCann, Jan Schapper
Abstract
Developing professional research practice in students through undergraduate research experiences
Jack Wang, Mark Schembri, John Fuerst
Abstract
Outcomes from the ALTC science learning and teaching academic standards project
Brian Yates, Susan Jones
Abstract
Learning without borders
Shelley Yeo, Veronica Goerke, Peter Ling, Margaret Mazzolini, Gillian Lueckenhausen, Beena Giridharan
Abstract

 

Evaluation of peer assessment in long case clinical examinations

Annette Burgess, Kirsten Black, Christopher Roberts, Craig Mellis

In stage 3 of the medical program, Sydney Medical School, students are required to sit a formative long case examination.  Peer students act as co-examiners, together with an academic examiner. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of students as examiners based on:

Results from 92 questionnaires (response rate 95%), focus groups and analysis of marking sheets (n=89) indicated that acting as a student co-examiner was useful in preparing students for their own long case examinations, that students had difficulty assessing and giving feedback to peers and that student examiners consistently marked higher than academics across all marking domains, however, these differences were not statistically significant.  Conclusions from the study suggest that acting as a peer examiner is a useful learning activity for students and that  students need further training in how to provide feedback.


Student and lecturer evaluation of tablet PC use for biomedical science lectures

Julia Choate, George Kotsanas

In 2010, all lecturing staff in a biomedical science unit used a tablet PC for lecturing. The tablet allowed the lecturers to use a digital pen instead of a laser pointer, encouraging annotations and drawings on the lecture slides. On completion of the unit the students (n=104) and lecturers (n=7) completed a survey about their experiences of the tablet lectures. 80% of the students agreed that the use of the tablet by the lecturer made the lecture more interesting and engaging; 75% of the students agreed that the use of the tablet improved their understanding of the lecture content; 76% of the students agreed that the use of the tablet helped them to keep pace with the lecture. The students were asked to suggest how the tablet lectures could be improved in the future; 36% of the student comments were related to the lack of lecturer experience with this new technology, with specific comments about poor handwriting and diagrams. The lecturers were surveyed to investigate if the transition from static Powerpoint lectures to tablet lectures caused them to alter their lecture preparation, delivery or content. All lecturers reduced the number of slides, concepts and lecture objectives, and replaced digital images with tablet drawings. In summary, the tablet encouraged lecturers to slow down and reduce their lecture content. These effects may have contributed to enhanced student interest and engagement in the lectures. However, lecturing staff need further experience with tablet technology in order to improve the student engagement with these lectures.


Development of an online role-play assessment initiative for nursing students in their bioscience studies

Judy Craft, Louise Ainscough

Devising assessment tasks for large units that embrace academic goals of authenticity and assessment variety can be a challenge.  We developed an online Role-Play Assessment Initiative for first year nursing students in bioscience.  Students responded to a case study by preparing two role-play dialogues: as a nurse with the patient, and between two nurses.  The aims were to assess whether the students could:  1) understand the underlying disease process (pathophysiology) and relate it to clinical practice; 2) use language appropriate for lay and medical conversation; and 3) apply information using active learning.   We conducted a student survey using quantitative questions (Likert scale: 1=strongly disagree to 5=strongly agree), and qualitative questions.  65 completed surveys were received.  80% of respondents agreed (includes agree or strongly agree) that it was a useful way to learn and understand pathophysiology of the case study.  86% agreed that it was useful to apply pathophysiology from lectures to a clinical setting.  Overall, students found it enjoyable, which is beneficial for enhanced student engagement, and agreed that it allowed them to work well in a group (74% and 85%, respectively).  Most qualitative suggestions for improvement related to group work, despite the encouraging response to group work in quantitative questions. Most positive comments surrounded different communication with a nurse compared with a patient. These results demonstrate that students developed deeper understanding of pathophysiology through active learning and were able to expand their nursing career skills during the role-play.  Learning using role-play to simulate the workforce has fostered active learning.


Psychological literacy and adaptive cognition in a first-year university classroom

Jacquelyn Cranney, Sue Morris

In the call to re-examine the aims of undergraduate psychology education (Halpern, 2010), we have argued that the concepts of adaptive cognition and psychological literacy should be key to these (McGovern et al., 2010). Psychological literacy is the capacity to use psychological knowledge adaptively (Cranney & Dunn, in press), and adaptive cognition is defined as global ways of thinking (and consequently behaving) that are beneficial to one’s (and others’) survival and well-being (Cranney & Morris, in press). Psychology education is one arena in which this perspective can be shared and experienced. In a first-year psychology unit we instituted three training approaches:  positivity strategies, study skills strategies, and peer-mentoring.  These approaches were implemented in turn, across three tutorial groups.  For positivity and study skills, students were given information on six strategies, and asked to attempt one strategy over the next week. During the following week’s class, they rated their experiences. In the peer-mentoring condition, pairs of students took turns in being peer mentor and mentee. After three weeks of implementation, the three approaches were rated by students as equally effective. Over remaining weeks, all students were exposed to the other two approaches. In the final course evaluation, the approaches were rated equally and highly effective. Students indicated that they would more likely utilize the positivity and study strategies in the future cf. peer-mentoring.  This study indicates that these strategies can be integrated early in the curriculum, serving to demonstrate to students how such strategies can be adaptively applied in their own lives. 


The Griffith PRO-Teaching Project: Sharing Ideas to Develop Capabilities with Peer Review and Observation of Teaching

Steve Drew

The Griffith PRO-Teaching project uses a developmental form of peer observation (review) of teaching that creates a collaborative and supportive atmosphere for staff to discuss and share ideas around teaching practice. Using a structured approach, data is collected from a range of sources to build evidence of teaching quality that may complement or contrast with the standard Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET) questionnaires that are currently the major determinant of teaching quality. At each observation session SETs and student learning outcomes (minute tests) are collected for that particular session. The staff member being observed first relates their own reflections on that session. Then, observation notes from a discipline based observer and an L&T expert observer provide two diverse peer perspectives. Multiple perspectives provide a triangulated data set from which validated evidence can be built. The part that all staff love is the chat at the end of each observation session where reflection is validated, strengths are recognized, and ideas for development are discussed and agreed. Staff use peer feedback to guide changes to practice in the following sessions. Evidence is collated and presented in a comprehensive report with a range of supporting documents. All data belongs to academics involved and nothing is shared beyond the observation triad (The process has ethics approval). Staff have used evidence from the project to support applications for promotion, job applications, Griffith Awards for Excellence in Teaching, ALTC Awards, and potentially to complement evidence for confirmation of appointment. In three semesters, 75 academics have taken part in 100 observations, 32 being from Science, Engineering or Technology disciplines. Most had never engaged in peer observation before. All relate positive outcomes and offer constructive feedback.


Scoping evaluation of eLearning support in campus-based universities

Gregory Leahy, Mary-Helen Ward

This poster illustrates an evaluation framework for eLearning support that is integrated as part of a largely campus-based student experience of learning. Evaluations that fit an appropriate quality assurance framework at a large, multi-campus, research-intensive university need to adopt both quality and improvement-based methods in aim and approach.  This will include case-study approaches, heuristic or inspection approaches (experience based) as well as methods of inquiry, depending on the key area of eLearning being evaluated. As will be outlined in the poster, each key area of eLearning has the student learning experience at its centre, and the subsequent evaluation model is developed within this evidence-based framework of quality assurance. A cyclical model for each area of four areas of evaluation will be presented in this poster, which will demonstrate where each inter-related aspect of eLearning is situated in relation to the student experience. The poster will present an overview of an integrated evaluation approach, which provides an ongoing investigation of eLearning support in the student learning experience.


eBooks A key to greater accessibility

Andrew Lovell-Simons, Sharon Kerr

Accessibility Services (MQAS) is a central service unit that converts learning materials into accessible formats for students with access needs. This service is provided for 12 universities throughout Australia and employs 100 + staff to convert learning materials from print-based into alternate, accessible formats. This process is time and labor intensive, with students receiving the converted content, either ‘just in time’ or late. If all study materials and resources were initially published in an accessible format, considerable resources would be saved and all students would have access to content in the format they require and when they require. The development of eBooks and the availability of iPads, give students the chance to access content when and how they want. If all content is initially published in the ePub format, students can decide to read it on an eBook reader choosing the text size and font that suits their learning style and access need. If they are using the iPad as their eBook reader, students can use its screen reading functionality and have all the content read to them. One academic has requested to have her new book published straight to the ePub format. The book is a text in ‘Foundations of College Music Theory’. Publishing straight to ePub, means that students will have access to more up to date content. Students will also be able to use the multimedia functions of the iPad, to listen as well as read the music.


New graduates negotiating the transition to work in international non-government organizations in Vietnam

Lan Mai

This transition is particularly complicated in Vietnam, a country which has recently undergone significant economic reform (“Doi moi”). Although the shift towards a free market has lead to expanded opportunities for graduates, the resulting competition in the job market (Nguyen, 2010) makes it harder to get a job. In this context, learning and teaching need to change. The “codified knowledge” acquired from didactic teaching in universities can be at odds with the often “informal and tacit” knowledge required in the workplace (Entwistle 2007), especially in countries such as Vietnam, where the veneration of learning and for teaching is remarkably strong (Nguyen 2005). Disparity between the expectations of new graduates and employers is highly likely in sectors, such as the non-government organizations (INGOs), which have expanded in the new economy, because these are thought to require critical and independent thinking for problem–solving and self-directed initiatives. Given this probable mismatch there is an urgent need to investigate the experiences of both parties. This poster, representing the first stage of the research will give insights into the challenges graduates face in the new multicultural workforce in Vietnam. It will outline the findings from a thematic analysis of a sample of interviews, alongside an analysis of job advertisements. A comparison of the two sets of findings will highlight the important role Vietnamese universities need to play in developing students’ cultural and social capital.


Promoting academic integrity among students

Jennifer Martin, Karen van Haeringen

How an institution manages cases of academic misconduct depends on a number of factors including institutional policy and practice.  This policy and practice needs to be underpinned by reliable data on numbers of cases, student demographics and outcomes and supported by adequate resources and systems.  Therefore, Griffith University sought to develop a new framework to manage and support academic integrity by focussing on prevention and education together with a centralised tracking system and a central coordinator.  Prior to this, data was not consistently or readily available across the University and cases were managed on an ad hoc basis by individual faculties and schools.  New processes for managing breaches of academic integrity were trialled and minor problems were addressed.  Evaluation data was gathered at every step of the way and after a significant trial period the processes and policy were evaluated both internally and externally and the policies were formalised taking into account recommendations from an external evaluator.  The University now has a very successful system, recognised nationally on the AUQA Good Practice database, for managing and promoting academic integrity among students. This system allows the university to collect data that assists with determining where best to place resources to support student learning. 


Developing students' oral communication skills: Tutor and student resources for academic practice

Linda Murray

The creation, in 2005, of a UK Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) concerned with learning development – LearnHigher – provided the opportunity for the development of resources for staff and students in 16 learning areas. One of these was the area of “oral communication” and this poster will illustrate the nature of the resources that are freely available on the LearnHigher website by reference to the oral communication area in particular. Knowledge of the award-winning LearnHigher resources should assist those whose role involves the development of students’ academic practices. In developing the resources, each learning area coordinator within LearnHigher piloted their use in their own work, obtaining feedback directly from students. The resources have also been trialled, and feedback provided, by the other LearnHigher partners. The suite of video-based tutor resources was awarded third place at the 2009 Jorum Learning and Teaching awards, and was also shortlisted for the Epigeum Video resources awards 2009. The resources also won an Effective Practices award at the 2010 Sloan-Merlot Conference, San Jose, USA
Discussion around this poster is expected to raise issues about

  1. the feasibility of running effective F2Fworkshops in areas of academic practice
  2. the institutional responsibility for, and organisation of, such work
  3. good practice in relation to the use of web resources

Integrating research teaching and experience into graduate medical curriculum

Judy Mullan, Kathryn Weston, Peter McLennan, Warren Rich

Few Australian medical practitioners have post-graduate research qualifications or engage actively in research and many graduating doctors believe their knowledge of basic research skills is lacking (Millar, 2009). In developing a medical curriculum for the new Graduate School of Medicine (GSM), at the University of Wollongong, we took the opportunity to embed and integrate research and critical analysis (RCA) throughout the 4-year postgraduate program with the long-term aim of developing research-aware doctors practising evidence-based medicine. As part of the RCA program, all students conduct their own community-based research project during their 12-month placement in a regional or rural area of New South Wales. Their research project aims to consolidate and expand the research skills introduced throughout the curriculum since its commencement in 2007. This presentation reports on the success of the program in providing important research experience and skills.


'Moving Forward' - A widening participation initiative for primary aged pupils

Carole Nairn, Lesley-Anne Holder

Following the successful introduction and implementation of the Learner Progression Framework, from Years 7 through to post graduate progression, the University of Chichester piloted a programme of interventions targeted at primary transition to secondary education. Research into barriers to progression has indicated that this transition age is pivotal to pupils’ future aspirations. By realising the opportunities available throughout their education, the programme aims to instil an ‘I Can’ attitude before embarking on Key Stage 3 studies.  The poster presentation will illustrate the planning, delivery model used and critical success factors of the project which offers a springboard into the progressive outreach programme offered by the University of Chichester.  Photographs, quotes, research and evaluations will be included as well as a film to allow delegates to view the on-campus activities. The focus is on aspiration- and awareness-raising and is offered to all Year 6 students, ages 10/11, in mixed ability groups in feeder primary schools to our Widening Participation target secondary schools. Pupils engage with trained primary ambassadors to work through a series of four visits both on- and off-campus and discover the ambassador’s personal pathways to university. The culmination of the programme is a Mini Graduation Ceremony attended by students, teachers and parents/carers. Now in its second year, the successful programme has been rolled out to allow 650 pupils to benefit, with plans to recruit a dedicated member of staff for programme delivery in 2011/2012,  thus reaching out potentially to 1800, Year 6, pupils.  


The use of Optical Mark Recognition (OMR) software in assessment at Bond University

Jeremy Rogers, Linda Crane

All universities strive for accuracy and quality in assessment. At Bond University in 2008, we transitioned from an inflexible and expensive pre-printed system (Pearsons) to Remark Office OMR, a highly accurate and flexible mark recognition software / hardware system. The poster will showcase an example assessment marking sheet, and the resultant analysis that comes from the built-in analysis function within Remark Office OMR, with a summary of the steps involved between each stage. A comparative study was run in the transition period between systems with focus on maintaining or improving efficiency, quality and analysis output. Remark was found to have improved outcomes on all benchmarked outcomes. The outcome(s) of this poster, is to show peers in the field of assessment, practical new ideas in achieving quality in assessment, with the example of the use of mark recognition software at Bond University.


Indigenous students and accessibility

Roslyn Sackley, Judith Booth

There is a high correlation between a disability and a student’s decision not to complete their degree (AUSSE 2010: 44). So far evidence has been fairly anecdotal about the extent of the problem in regard to indigenous students. For example, a student coming from a rural or remote area into an urban higher education institution in Sydney can be so overwhelmed with culture shock that a disability like mild dyslexia may remain undetected.  The purpose of this study is to obtain a student perspective on the issues surrounding Indigenous students with a disability not self-identifying their disability, and therefore not seeking and securing assistance in the same manner as the general student body. We already know to some extent that an Indigenous student may be unable to self-identify a disability because of a whole range of problems they may be dealing with such as homesickness, anxiety, depression and family obligations to name a few. Additionally, they may be unaware that anxiety and depression are themselves reasons to seek assistance.  We will investigate further how Indigenous students view disability through conducting a focus group session to explore the issues described above at the second block release program at Macquarie University in April this year. Roslyn Sackley, a Ngiyampaa Aboriginal woman from Central NSW and an Indigenous adviser with a vision impairment will lead the discussion. The research findings will be used to propose increased and culturally appropriate measures taken to ensure that Indigenous students with disabilities will have the same level of access to support services as non Indigenous students. It will also encourage them to take full advantage of the resources available to support them so that they can participate more fully and succeed in university life.


Predictors of dropout following the first semester of a nursing program

Yenna Salamonson, Lucie Ramjan, Lien Lombardo, Jane Koch

Although student attrition from nursing programs is not a new issue (Andrew, et al., 2008), the impending nursing workforce shortage has again raise this issue to the forefront in nursing education (Gaynor, et al., 2007). As the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) targets the recruitment of an additional nursing students (Office of Nicola Roxon, 2008), it is critical for nursing education institutions to profile undergraduate nursing students for workforce planning, and to identify and support those who are at risk of dropping out. This study examined the association between the admission characteristics of students to the nursing program and dropout at the end of the first semester, first year. Student data extracted from the student management system included: age, gender, country of birth, enrolment classification and enrolment status. Attendance at the Week 0 orientation session was also recorded. Logistic regression yielded adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for each student characteristic by enrolment status at the end of the first semester. Of the total 965 commencing students, 77% (n=741) attended the Week 0 orientation session. At the end of the first semester, 12% (n=111) were no longer enrolled in the course. Compared to attendees at orientation, the ORs (95% CI) of non-attendees were 2.65 (1.61-4.37) for dropping out. Students older than 23 years [ORs: 1.84 (1.23-3.02)] and males [ORs: 1.88 (1.11-3.20)] were also more likely to drop out.  Targeting and supporting these at risk groups is likely to have a positive impact on first year nursing student retention.


Understanding and enhancing the experience of international learners and academic teaching staff

Julie Shaw, Creina Mitchell, Letitia Del Fabbro, Colleen Cuddihy

The learning and teaching experience of international students in Australia has recently gained national attention (Bradley, Noonan, Nugent & Scales, 2008).  Academic institutions are incorporating an international focus in their core business strategies (Griffith University [GU], 2007) and teaching and learning policies (GU, n.d.). Challenges for international students include transition to the study environment, learning outcomes, and satisfaction. In turn, the international diversity of the student body has a major impact on the experience of academic staff, their development of teaching skills and satisfaction.  This project arose from concerns among staff that international student needs and experiences were not being met. This project used a Participatory Action Research (PAR) method (Hare, 2007; Hooley, 2002; Meyer, 2004; Yasmeen, 2008), which is an accepted and validated approach to quality enhancement in Higher Education and in facilitating change (Kember & Jones, 2001).  Face-to-face focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with international students to explore their experiences.  Academic staff participated in focus groups and PAR cycles. Both students and teachers identified language as a significant issue for student learning in the academic and work integrated learning environments. Most students stated that it took 6-12 months living and studying in Australia before they started thinking in English.  Clinical facilitators identified the time required for translation in nursing practice as a risk to patient safety. Teaching staff reported a greater awareness of the needs of international students and commented on the importance of implementing varied teaching strategies to promote student learning. 


Contextual influences associated with variation in conversations about teaching

Kate Thomson

Communicating about teaching is a key element of scholarship (Healey, 2003) and vital to enhancing practice (Boud, 1999). Informal corridor conversations about teaching might introduce academics to the scholarship of teaching and learning and contribute to their academic identity and professional development. Academics can exchange ideas and co-create their departmental teaching context through informal conversation, yet little is known about this discourse or how it is facilitated. Supportive teaching contexts have been linked to an increase in the number and significance of conversations (Roxå & Mårtensson, 2009), and excellence in teaching quality (Gibbs, Knapper & Piccini, 2009). Departmental initiatives designed to support academic practice may be informed by an exploration of academics’ accounts of what influences conversation about teaching. The nature of informal academic discourse was studied through interviews with academic staff working at an Australian research-intensive university. Variation in responses was facilitated through the selection of several departments across disciplines. Interviews were based on a semi-structured interview schedule, and analysed using Grounded theory (Glaser & Strauss, 1967).Academics described designated times and spaces, current events, and availability of appropriate colleagues as influencing their conversations about teaching. For example, conversation was facilitated by an established ‘tea break’ time, being in the midst of a curriculum review, and having colleagues in neighbouring offices with whom they were friendly. The role of conversations in academic identity and development means we should investigate how to build the sorts of supportive contexts described.


Collaborative collisions: Learning skills, information literacy and disciplines

Lynette Torres, Glen Croy, Susan Mayson, Leanne McCann, Jan Schapper

The purpose of this poster is to describe a successful collaboration between academics and library staff sharing a common interest in developing students’ research skills. While successful collaborations are not uncommon, they are often the exception and usually formed through personal links. The collaboration presented reflects early stages of our story; however, the experience described is one of incremental success. The collaborative model is designed as a sustainable approach for longer term benefits. Our experience represents a generalisable model for other university contexts. Our approach has been to identify shared interests, collaboration benefits, and to address differences and challenges from our respective areas. This has developed practical, diverse and sometimes surprising outcomes. We are successfully establishing a stronger nexus between areas and roles, traditionally  perceived as distinct in the university, resulting in evident benefits for students. A key learning from our collaboration has been the recognition that partnerships with academics requires that learning skills advisors and librarians refocus their roles from providing a “service” to developing partnerships with academics. This requires support and sensitivity. We are now witnessing markers of successful embedding of the RSD through our collaborative attempts. These include enlisting the Pro-Vice Chancellor Learning and Teaching’s strategic support for the “bottom up” collaborative approach; the opportunity to develop and deliver a fully enrolled RSD module for the Graduate Certificate in Higher Education (GCHE) and the realisation that there are a number of very active pockets of RSD activity across the university.


Developing professional research practice in students through undergraduate research experiences

Jack Wang, Mark Schembri, John Fuerst

Practical laboratory exercises form a large component of undergraduate science courses.  Traditional laboratory classes involve students following identical sets of laboratory protocols to arrive at predictable experimental results, which they have no personal or intellectual investment in. This does not adequately educate students about professional scientific enquiry and has limited real-world relevance.  This disparity between how science is taught and how science is practiced professionally acts as a deterrent against a career in this field.  This project attempted to address these issues by introducing an inquiry-based Undergraduate Research Experience (URE) into undergraduate Microbiology courses at UQ. This directly exposed large undergraduate cohorts to scientific practice and the research process. The URE was implemented across two modules; the first module highlighted discipline-specific experimental skills, and the second involved the application of these skills towards a new experimental context.  Student development was monitored through progressive assessment items revolving around core scientific proficiencies.  Quantitative data containing student marks, student and instructor assessment of learning gains, and student perceptions towards science as a career path was collated after each module. Students demonstrated improvements in key scientific skills and acknowledged the effectiveness of the URE in establishing an authentic research environment; an increased interest in further study or career paths in science was also reported for some students.  Increased student engagement in scientific research early in their education is crucial in the development of the next generation of scientists who will drive innovation and discovery.


Outcomes from the ALTC science learning and teaching academic standards project

Brian Yates, Susan Jones

By 1 July 2011, the Academic Standards for bachelor degrees in Science will have been finalised and presented to the Australian Council of Deans of Science for endorsement. This poster will summarise the process that we undertook in the science community, the feedback received from the 39 Australian universities that offer degrees in science, and the plans for promotion and renewal of the science academic standards in higher education. We will also discuss some of the lessons learned from the consultation process, and summarise the progress made by the Chemistry and Mathematics working parties to develop academic standards which are specific to their subject areas. Finally we will outline plans for further work in the science academic standards area, including the development of other science subject-specific standards, Honours and Masters standards, examples of learning and teaching activities to support the academic standards, and examples of assessment and demonstration of achievement of the academic standards.


Learning without borders

Shelley Yeo, Veronica Goerke, Peter Ling, Margaret Mazzolini, Gillian Lueckenhausen, Beena Giridharan

The poster is based on findings of the 2008-2011 ALTC project Learning without borders: Linking development of transnational leadership roles to international and cross-cultural teaching excellence. The project focuses on leadership roles in the conduct of transnational education and internationalisation of the curriculum. It has involved an investigation of staff experiences, expectations and preferences on issues including influences on career paths and on learning and teaching together with the identification of good practice in this area. As policies and procedures are crafted to ensure equivalence between onshore and offshore programs the project is also concerned with arrangements to ensure the quality of programs. The project has involved the Australian and Sarawak campuses of the project partner universities, Swinburne University of Technology and Curtin University. Conduct of a symposium in Sarawak provided the opportunity for focus groups, feedback and trialling of professional development materials. The project will deliver three self-paced professional development modules for staff engaging in transnational education and internationalisation, adaptable to any university and a report on research findings relating to:



*Please note that this program is indicative only and subject to change. Pre-conference workshops incur additional fees and require registration. If you have already registered to attend the conference and would now like to register to attend pre-conference workshops please download and complete the pre-conference workshop registration form.

Photography
Event photographers will be working during HERDSA 2011 to photograph presenters and delegates during conference sessions and social events. Photographs taken during the conference may appear on the HERDSA 2011 conference website or in future publications related to HERDSA. A selection of photographs may also be displayed as a projected slideshow in the venue prior to commencing proceedings each day. Please advise photographers if you do not wish to be included in a photograph.

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