Workshops

The following pre-conference workshops will be running on Monday 6th July 2015.

MORNING WORKSHOPS (9:30am-12:30pm)
1. Developing responsive, adaptable, employable graduates: A workshop on enabling change
3. Using technology to develop critical thinking - Critica
5. OLT fellowship workshop: Top tips & tales from successful fellows
7. Enabling and developing independent successful learners

AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS (1:30pm-4:30pm)
2. Maker space challenge: Creativity, curation and digital portfolios
4. Critical discourse analysis and close reading of texts: Powerful methodologies for analysing HE data 
6. Revitalising first year curriculum: Preparing students in first year as thinkers and practitioners in your discipline
8. Professionally relevant research skills developed during coursework masters

ALL DAY WORKSHOP (9:30am-4:30pm)
9. TATAL - Talking About Teaching And Learning *
* Please note: this workshop will take place at the Swinburne City Campus (Federation Room - Level 2, 196 Flinders Street, Melbourne, 3000 VIC, Australia) and not at the conference venue . How to get there
 

Workshop descriptions

1. Developing responsive, adaptable, employable graduates: A workshop on enabling change

Panel led by Dawn Bennett, Curtin University

Location: Room 101 - Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

Employability is a hot topic, but that doesn’t make it any easier to it within higher education; educating students to be responsive and adaptable professionals requires change both within higher education (teaching) and among students themselves (learning), to make adaptability, innovation and resilience part of graduates’ skills sets and attributes.
This unique and engaging workshop brings together six of the foremost innovators in higher education employability. Participants will (re)define employability, rethink graduate statistics, begin to evidence graduate capabilities, and gather tools and resources to help students prepare for uncertain and complex futures. The workshop is structured into six 20-minute sessions with a break mid-way through and ample space for discussion. It is highly relevant for everyone involved in higher education.

2. Maker space challenge: Creativity, curation and digital portfolios

Kathryn Coleman, Deakin University and Helen Chen, Stanford University

Location: Room 104 - Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

In light of growing pressures of accountability, increasing student diversity, and an emphasis on lifewide learning and co-curricular activities, new technologies such as digital portfolios have become a powerful way to document and demonstrate student learning. Higher education institutions and employers alike increasingly recognize the value and usefulness of these portfolios to support students, capture evidence of achievement of graduate capabilities, and evaluate prospective hires.

This workshop invites participants to explore the multidimensional purposes and functions of digital portfolios in addressing the diverse needs of learners, faculty, staff, programs, and institutions in higher education. A critical component underlying digital portfolios is the emphasis on how evidence of learning can be compiled, communicated, and shared with various stakeholders through this electronic medium. Digital portfolios are uniquely positioned to be a personalized learning space for life and work in a complex world but it is less clear how they can be effectively introduced and integrated into the higher education environment.

3. Using technology to develop critical thinking - Critica

Lesley-Jane Eales-Reynolds and Colin Clarke, Kingston University London

Location: Room 103 - Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

Aimed at educators and academic developers at all levels of experience. This workshop provides participants with a unique opportunity to learn about the research-based development of Critica, a bespoke application for scaffolding students’ critical thinking, as well as gaining hands on experience as both educator and student. The development of students’ critical thinking is a core feature of Higher Education and a necessity for responsive and adaptable professionals. Though research shows it is difficult to teach. Participants are requested to bring examples of assessment activities, which they will be supported in developing to elicit crtical thinking. Additionally, participants can engage with a group task for the duration of the conference, thus affording opportunities to experience flexible learning using a bespoke application in various settings. At the end of the conference the presenters will facilitate a social debriefing session to discuss participants’ experience with Critica and lessons for the future.

4. Critical discourse analysis and close reading of texts: Powerful methodologies for analysing HE data

Barbara Grant, University of Auckland

Location: Room 103 - Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

This workshop, led by Barbara Grant (Executive Editor of HERD) and other members of HERD's editorial team, will explore critical discourse analysis and close reading of texts as ways to analyse and interpret qualitative data in higher education research beyond a simply descriptive mode. The workshop will include input about these approaches to data, along with some practice exercises and discussion.

The data analysis processes explored in the workshop will be useful for dealing with the challenges of making sense of qualitative data in higher education research. They will also be helpful for producing analyses/interpretations of data that are sensitive to the uncertainty and complexity characteristic of knowledge about education.

Please note this workshop is supported by HERDSA and is FREE for full HERDSA delegates to attend

 

5. OLT fellowship workshop: Top tips & tales from successful fellows

Romy Lawson, University of Wollongong

Location: Room 102 - Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

The Australian Government Office of Learning and Teaching (OLT) has a well-established Fellowship program that advances learning and teaching in higher education by supporting leading educators to undertake strategic, high-profile activities in areas of importance to the sector. This workshop is designed to provide an insight into this Fellowship program for those interested in discovering more about what it means to be an OLT Fellow and to explore the process involved and offer guidance for those interested in applying for a fellowship. The workshop will be led by a selection of current and past Fellows who will be on hand to provide advice; share experiences and showcase the work they undertook as OLT Fellows.

6. Revitalising first year curriculum: Preparing students in first year as thinkers and practitioners in your discipline

Panel led by Theda Thomas, Australian Catholic University

Location: Room 102 - Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

Each discipline has its own requirements and ways of thinking. This workshop will focus on how we can develop students’ graduate capabilities from first year by enabling them to be effective learners, thinkers and practitioners in our disciplines. The workshop is aimed at curriculum developers, first year lecturers (any discipline), first year coordinators and academic developers. Interactive activities will be used to challenge participants to consider: • What students need to know and do in order to lay the foundation in first year for attaining graduate capabilities and meeting required standards by the time they graduate? • What bottlenecks are there to students learning those things –and what are the concepts that students find difficult as learners in the discipline? • What strategies can we use to help students develop the skills they need to be effective learners, thinkers and practitioners in our disciplines?

7. Enabling and developing independent successful learners

Iris Vardi, Vardi Consulting

Location: Room 104 - Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

In this world of increasing online education, ‘flipped classrooms’ and competing interests, the need for students who are prepared, organised and self-managing is more important than ever. But what conditions are necessary for creating the independent self-motivated lifelong learners we need for today and tomorrow? In this interactive and engaging workshop, participants will share experiences and examine:

  • The characteristics of successful learners
  • How to influence the development of student self-regulation skills
  • The impact of student belief systems and the implications for practice
  • Those factors in the learning and class environment that enable successful independence
  • Those factors in the learning and class environment that disable successful independence

This workshop will help you set up the conditions for enabling and developing independent successful learners. Come and join Dr Iris Vardi, an award winning presenter, for 3 lively and engaging hours that will give you a range of practical strategies and ideas.

Bio
Dr Iris Vardi has been involved in education for over 25 years. She is the winner of the HERDSA 2012 Conference Creative Presentation Award, the author of the 2013 HERDSA Guide Developing Students’ Critical thinking in the Higher Education Class, the author of the 2012 HERDSA Guide Effective Feedback for Student Learning in Higher Education and the recipient of a 2012 HERDSA Fellowship which recognised her “important contribution to higher education at the local, national and international levels, particularly in the areas of assessment, feedback, and the scholarship of teaching and learning”. She has presented extensively on assessment, teaching and learning, and has published internationally. Come and benefit from her many years of experience.

8. Professionally relevant research skills developed during coursework masters

John Willison, University of Adelaide

Location: Room 101 - Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

This workshop will provide participants with insights into the development of professionally relevant research skills in coursework Masters degrees. The focus will be enabling students to develop research mindedness in content-rich courses in ways that complement technical research methods courses, towards full-bodied research skills that are needed for capstone research projects. The workshop uses the Research Skill Development (RSD) framework as its conceptual model and shared language.

In the workshop you will encounter:

  • an introduction to major issues regarding developing coursework Masters students' research skills
  • five-minute presentations by academic representatives of four clusters of universities that each use the RSD framework in Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia
  • one out of four mini-workshop activities that you choose, based on the information from the four presentations
  • time to think through issues and apply to your Masters context


9. TATAL - Talking About Teaching And Learning

Stuart Schonell (UTAS), Geoff Treloar (ACT), Coralie McCormack (Canberra), Maria Northcote (Avondale), John Gilchrist (ACU)

Location: Swinburne City Campus (Federation Room - Level 2, 196 Flinders Street, Melbourne, 3000 VIC, Australia) . How to get there

TATAL workshops develop cohorts of reflective practitioners. Participants reflect on and share learning and teaching experiences aligned to the conference themes while developing networks with practitioners from other institutions. TATAL has been running since 2008 and the collaborative and scholarly focus of TATAL has resulted in publications, grants and teaching awards for past participants. (Examples of publications include: Miley, F., Cram, B., Griffin, A., Kennelly, R., McCormack, C., & Read, A. (2012). Using stories in teaching. HERDSA Guide. Higher Education Research development Society of Australasia; and Gilchrist, J., Hancock, E., Islam, J., McCormack, C., & Northcote, M. (2013). Collaborative Mentoring - reflection on the role of TATAL in the aftershock of a HERDSA Fellowship Application. HERDSA News, 35(3), pp. 16-18)

During the workshop participants will begin to develop a teaching philosophy statement and teaching portfolio while sharing their experiences with colleagues. After the conference participants can continue the TATAL experience through facilitated Skype sessions with TATAL colleagues to continue to reflect on their teaching philosophy and portfolio, for individual improvement or beginning the HERDSA Fellowship process.

Melbourne TATAL includes a full day pre-conference workshop and a follow up breakfast meeting.
Participation is free for delegates also attending the main HERDSA conference (except for day registrations), but a pre-registration is compulsory.


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