The Professional Doctorate in Education: An Exploration of Transnational Teaching

Helen BOULTON
Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom
helen.boulton@ntu.ac.uk

Tina BYROM
Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom
tina.byrom@ntu.ac.uk

Abstract

There is an increasing amount of literature focussing on internationalisation in Higher Education (HE) and the transnational delivery of courses there agenda, there is still much to share and learn in this new developing aspect of HE. This round table discussion will provide an opportunity to identify some of the key affordances and challenges related to pedagogy for universities focussing on cross cultural and sociocultural aspects of learning. In the UK we have a substantial literature base on which to build our learning and teaching pedagogies in Higher Education (Krathwall, 2002; Entwistle, 2009; Biggs and Tang, 2011) and an increasing body of literature to develop pedagogical strategies to encompass teaching multi-cultural groups in UK Universities, but the literature examining transnational delivery is relatively sparse. Hofstede (1985) opened the debate relating to cultural differences focussing on the social positions of teachers and students; differences in the relevance of curriculum; and patterns of student/teacher and student/student interaction. Ryan and Louie (2007) question acceptance of Eastern and Western cultural stereotypes and Marambe et al (2012) further unpick some of the myths around the Eastern learner, although Hong Kong was part of Britain for many years so could be considered to have Western educational pedagogies, but the educational experience of doctoral students has been very different to those in the UK.

This round table discussion will provide a much needed opportunity to share experiences of transnational teaching.

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