Pre-conference workshops

The pre-conference workshops will be held on Monday 27 June both virtually and on-site at Deakin Downtown. All other on-site conference events will be held at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre.

If you are also attending the conference you can book your registration for the pre-conference workshops during the conference registration process. The fee for each on-site pre-conference workshop, including the full day TATAL workshop partly subsidised by HERDSA as a benefit to members, is $80. The fee for each virtual pre-conference workshop is $60.  The on-site HERD workshop is free and fully subsidised by HERDSA as a benefit for members.

If you are not attending the conference and ONLY wish to attend a pre-conference workshop, you can register via the workshop only registration button below. The costs are $100 for each on-site pre-conference workshop and $80 for each virtual workshop. If you wish to attend the HERD-sponsored workshop, the fee for this is $20 for HERDSA members and $100 for non-members

Delegates registering for a half-day on-site workshop will receive either morning tea or afternoon tea. Those who register for the full day TATAL workshop will receive morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea.

On-site full-day workshop (9.30am - 3.00pm)

Workshop 1 - Talking about teaching and learning (TATAL)

Facilitators
Mrs Mary-Ann Shuker, Griffith University
Prof Raj Shekhawat, Flinders University

(Maximum participants 30)

The fee for this workshop is partially subsidised by HERDSA as a benefit to members.

Aim
Talking about Teaching and Learning (TATAL) workshops seek to create a safe, trusting, respectful space where cohorts of reflective practitioners meet regularly to enhance their teaching and the learning of their students, to develop a teaching philosophy statement and an ongoing sense of inquiry.

Overview
The TATAL experience begins online and continues after the conference workshop through synchronous online or face-to-face collaborative sessions, with a view to improving practice.

Audience
Academics with over two years of teaching experience who seek time and the support of others to develop an understanding and awareness of their teaching philosophy. Deans of Education, Academic Developers and champions who seek to foster a serious approach to challenges, changes and opportunities in teaching and learning in their institution.

Context
This 10th TATAL workshop supports HERDSA’s aim to ‘facilitate and promote the enhancement of teaching and learning on an ongoing basis’.

Learning outcomes
On completion of the workshop participants will have:
• Established a safe collaborative environment in which to continue to investigate the challenges and successes of teaching and learning.
• Enhanced their skills and confidence in talking and writing about teaching and learning.
• Begun to articulate a personal teaching philosophy.

Workshop plan
Activities commence in a flipped class format from 23rd June with presentations, discussions and free writing. At the pre-conference workshop, TATALers begin constructing their teaching philosophy by free writing responses to stimulating questions. On Friday 9th July, TATALers engage in a synchronous/skype session with experienced TATALers and arrange meetings to continue collaborative reflection on their teaching philosophy and begin to prepare teaching portfolios. As it takes time to develop a safe environment in which to reflect and to write freely, this workshop requires more than a half day to achieve its objectives.

On-site half-day workshops (morning 8.30am - 12.00pm)

Workshop 2 – I’m beginning to publish in higher education – what next? HERD sponsored workshop

HERD sponsored workshop

Facilitators
Dr Wendy Green, University of Tasmania
A/Prof Susan Blackley, Curtin University
A/Prof Eva Heinrich, Massey University

The fee for this workshop is fully subsidised by HERDSA as a benefit to members.

(Maximum participants 40)

Aim
In this workshop, we focus on two issues of interest to emerging and experienced researchers in the field of higher education and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). These are becoming an effective peer reviewer and increasing the impact of one’s research.

This session will be run as two mini-workshops. Participants are welcome to attend one or both.

Overview of the mini-workshops
The first mini-workshop will focus on peer reviewing – the advantages of peer reviewing, how to write an effective peer review, and how to manage one’s peer reviewing workload.

Following a short break, the second mini-workshop will address questions about how to increase the impact of one’s research, with a particular focus on social media.

Both sessions will be highly interactive, introducing participants to a range of practical strategies and resources. In the second mini-workshop participants will have opportunities to apply some strategies to increasing the impact of their own research.

Intended audience
These mini-workshops are designed for those already undertaking research in the field of higher education or the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning who want to develop their knowledge and expertise, contribute to the development of the field, and extend the impact of their own work on further research and practice.

Context
One way to develop as a researcher is to become a peer reviewer. Peer reviewing can help researchers become better writers, because it puts researchers in touch with emerging research in their areas of interest and provides opportunities to critically review their own research approaches and methods (Kelly, Sadeghieh, & Adeli, 2014). Moreover, an invitation to review demonstrates one’s standing in the field and can add value to CVs. However, those who are new to reviewing can feel daunted by the responsibility and lack confidence in their new role.

Another challenge facing emerging, and even experienced researchers in all fields and disciplines, including higher education, is to ensure that their research impacts on practice and/or further research. Although journals and other publishers of scholarly work have strategies designed to increase the impact of the research they publish, much of the responsibility for increasing the impact and uptake of scholarly outputs falls on the researchers themselves. However, with the ever-increasing options available, particularly through social media, authors can find it difficult to plan for the type of impact they want their research to make.

Learning outcomes
• Enhanced awareness of the value of peer reviewing
• Enhanced confidence to undertake peer reviewing
• Enhanced awareness of the importance of increasing the impact of research
• Enhanced ability to increase the impact of one’s own research.

Brief workshop plan
Mini-workshop 1
• Introductions, aims and icebreaker
• Large group discussion: why review?
• Small and large group discussion: Characteristics of an effective review
• Small group activity: Revising and improving a sample review
• Short panel discussion: Managing your workload as a reviewer with tips from experienced reviewers
• Mini-presentation: Becoming a reviewer: HERD’s criteria for joining the College of Reviewers
• Final reflections and resources – handouts.

Break

Mini-workshop 2
• Introductions, aims
• Small and large group discussion: Discussing the ‘why’ and ‘how’: what is ‘impact’, why is it important to increase it, and what journals and other publishers do and don’t do to increase impact
• Mini-presentation and small group activity: Writing your manuscript with optimal impact in mind (titles, keywords, abstract, journal choice, etc)
• Mini-presentation: Options available to authors with examples from successful dissemination campaigns
• Small group activity: practice tweets, media releases etc
• Planning for success: Individual action plans for increasing impact and large group reflection
• Resources – handouts.

Workshop 3 – Learning from experience to enhance pedagogical approaches to online learning

Facilitators
Prof Anthony Whitty, Australian Catholic University
A/Prof Linda Corrin, Deakin University

(Maximum participants 40)

Recent events have resulted in many changes to how we teach in higher education, especially in terms of the pedagogies we use to engage students online. As teaching staff across universities have been moved out of comfort zones there have been new problems to solve, new scenarios for offering support for students’ learning, but also many examples of interesting and innovative approaches to teaching that can improve the student learning experience. In this workshop we will explore what we’ve learnt from the disrupted educational environment, the move to more flexible teaching models, and how we can build digital and pedagogical fluency to enhance the design and facilitation of learning in the online space. Adopting a world café style, the workshop activities will focus on addressing core learning and teaching challenges and issues sourced from participants prior to the workshop. Participants will work collaboratively in small groups to share experiences and develop solutions to address these issues. The aim is to generate practical guidance for how learning and teaching in online, HyFlex, and blended models can be enhanced, building on what we have learnt in recent times to create better learning experiences for our students. This workshop is suitable for a wide audience including teaching staff, learning designers, learning technologists, academic developers, and researchers and all participants will have a chance to network and engage with others while developing practical solutions that can inform their own practice.

Workshop 4 – University Staff Experiences During and ‘Post’ Global Pandemic:
Lessons Learnt and Prospective Future

Facilitators

Dr Kwong Nui Sim, Auckland University of Technology
Kwong Nui is an award-winning emerging scholar/academic committed to enhance practices in the use of educational technology for students and teachers as well as within doctoral education and academic development capacity. She is currently a senior lecturer/learning and teaching consultant at AUT Learning Transformation LAB, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand and has  been active in the scholarship of higher education for about a decade now.

Prof Klara Bolander Laksov, Stockholm University
As Director of the Centre for the Advancement of University teaching, www.su.se/ceul Klara strives to support the university as an organisation to develop good conditions for learning, both for students and staff. This is done in collaboration with colleagues at the department of Education and distributed all over Stockholm University and in constant dialogue with the management of the university. She is also a researcher in higher education and medical education. Part of the time she is also the director of a research group on learning in clinical contexts at Karolinska Institutet.

A/Prof Anna Serbati, University of Trento
Anna holds a PhD in Education and works at the Department of Psychology and Cognitive Science at the University of Trento, in Italy. She is member of the Quality Assurance Unit and of the Teaching and Learning centre of the institution. Her teaching expertise is in the field of assessment and feedback. Her research interests concerns academic development, educational innovation, curriculum design peer assessment and self-assessment. She has designed and implemented for Italian institutions several staff development programs face-to-face and online.

Dr Bonnie Dean, University of Wollongong
Bonnie is Head of Academic Development and Recognition at the University of Wollongong. She has a background in marketing and creative arts and has spent time teaching in the Faculty of Business before completing a PhD in work-integrated learning. She is currently leading a project for an institutional approach to WIL Pedagogy at UOW. She is Chair of the ACEN NSW/ACT State Chapter and sits on the ACEN Board of Directors. Recently, Bonnie spent almost three years in the School of Nursing as the Curriculum Manger, designing quality, authentic assessments and enhancing teaching and learning practices and processes. 

(Maximum participants 40)

Aim: The aim of the workshop is to engage participants in a series of planning ideas/activities resulting from shared staff experiences during and ‘post’ global pandemic.

Audience: This pre-conference workshop is designed for university staff members who are interested to take part in planning ideas/activities based on what we have learnt during the global pandemic. The planning aims to address the prospective future for staff ‘post’ the global pandemic and/or due to any unpredictable disruption in the future.

Prior to the pre-conference workshop: Participants will complete an online activity to share their relevant experiences and interests.

During the pre-conference workshop: Participants will engage in an array of facilitated activities to assist them to network with other like-minded colleagues, and design a series of planning ideas/activities to enhance university staff experiences.

After the pre-conference workshop: Participants will engage in facilitated online meetings and/or activities to share their project progress, and gain feedback from the facilitators.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • expand their professional network;
  • raise their awareness of HERDSA and other relevant professional activities;
  • build capacity in scholarship of staff experiences; and
  • produce a plan to inform an investigation of university staff experiences (i.e., challenges and opportunities of professional relevance).

Abstract

It is still early to predict whether and when research, training, meetings, and other academic activities return back to “normal”, but appears that some changes are here to stay (Mohr, 2021). Key challenges include creating social, emotional, and cognitive engagement, catering to diverse student needs and providing holistic learning experiences (Müller et al, 2021). Research consistently highlights the importance of improving staff experiences for more promising student success. Community practices play a critical role in providing better staff experiences through peer support and collective efforts.

In this workshop, academic developers from different parts of the world will come together as buddies to:

  1. Unpack university staff experiences and identify changes caused by global pandemic
  2. Co-construct the prospects of university staff experiences ‘post’ global pandemic
  3. Recognise the significance of positive and healthy staff experience in moving towards enhanced student success.

Come along and join us in this informative yet informal workshop where we will think differently and cross boundaries to recognise the potential of collaborative thinking and planning as a practice that can: improve university staff experiences, grow professional communities, and bring joy into our daily role.

On-site half-day workshops (afternoon 12.30pm - 4.00pm)

Workshop 5 – Introduction to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning:Designing a SoTL Plan

Facilitator
A/Prof Deb Clarke, Charles Sturt University

(Maximum participants 25)

Aim: The aim of the workshop is to engage new scholars in a series of planning activities resulting in a SoTL project plan.

Audience: The pre-conference workshop is intended for new scholars who have not published in a peer reviewed learning and teaching in higher education journal. New scholars can be higher degree research students or experienced academics who have discipline-only publications and are keen to engage in Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).

Facilitators: The workshop will be facilitated by experienced SoTL writers who are members of the HERDSA Executive, and/or Associate Editors/Reviewers of Learning and Teaching in Higher Education Journals.

Prior to the pre-conference workshop: Participants will complete a range of learning activities from the HERDSA Online SoTL Modules and meet online to discuss their teaching experience and interests.

During the pre-conference workshop: Participants will engage in an array of facilitated activities to assist them to network with other like-minded academics, and design a plan for a SoTL investigation.

After the pre-conference workshop: Participants will engage in facilitated online meetings to share their project progress, and gain feedback from the HEDSA facilitator/s.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • expand their professional academic network;
  • raise their awareness of HERDSA professional activities;
  • build capacity in scholarship of teaching and learning; and
  • produce a SoTL plan to inform an investigation of a learning and teaching challenge of professional relevance.

Workshop 6 – Improving feedback practices: the role of learner-teacherrelationships and digitally enabled learning design

Facilitators
A/Prof Rola Ajjawi, Deakin University
Prof Elizabeth Molloy, The University of Melbourne
A/Prof Kelly Matthews, The University of Queensland

(Maximum participants 40)

Learner engagement in Australian universities is at an all-time low (QILT, 2020). Fostering interaction in online learning during a pandemic has proven challenging for teaching academics (Matthews et al, 2021). Research consistently highlights the importance of positive learner-teacher interactions for student learning, belonging, and engagement. Good feedback practices play a critical role in student learning and motivation through tailoring the curriculum to a learner’s needs. Good feedback practices show students that teachers care – they are seen, heard, and recognised as knowledge holders able to contribute to the learning of others and take ownership for their own learning.

In this workshop, teaching academics from all disciplines, learning designers, educational technologists, curriculum leaders, academic developers, higher education researchers, and students will come together as learning friends to:

  1. Challenge assumptions of feedback practices and identify changes caused by COVID-19
  2. Re-centre the role of learner-teacher relationships, emotions, community, and belonging in feedback practices and design
  3. Identify processes of feedback co-construction and the place of digital tools in moving toward meaningful learning interactions and community building

Come along and join Rola, Liz, and Kelly in this informative yet informal workshop where we will think differently and cross boundaries to recognise the potential of feedback as a practice that can: improve learning, grow caring learning communities, and bring joy into our classes.

Virtual workshops (morning 10:00am – 12:00pm)

Virtual workshop 1 - Introduction to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Designing a SoTL Plan

Facilitator
A/Prof Deb Clarke, Charles Sturt University

(Maximum participants 15)

Aim: The aim of the workshop is to engage new scholars in a series of planning activities resulting in a SoTL project plan.

Audience: The pre-conference workshop is intended for new scholars who have not published in a peer reviewed learning and teaching in higher education journal. New scholars can be higher degree research students or experienced academics who have discipline-only publications and are keen to engage in Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).

Facilitators: The workshop will be facilitated by experienced SoTL writers who are members of the HERDSA Executive, and/or Associate Editors/Reviewers of Learning and Teaching in Higher Education Journals.

Prior to the pre-conference workshop: Participants will complete a range of learning activities from the HERDSA Online SoTL Modules and meet online to discuss their teaching experience and interests.

During the pre-conference workshop: Participants will engage in an array of facilitated activities to assist them to network with other like-minded academics, and design a plan for a SoTL investigation.

After the pre-conference workshop: Participants will engage in facilitated online meetings to share their project progress, and gain feedback from the HERDSA facilitator/s.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • expand their professional academic network;
  • raise their awareness of HERDSA professional activities;
  • build capacity in scholarship of teaching and learning; and

produce a SoTL plan to inform an investigation of a learning and teaching challenge of professional relevance.

Virtual workshop 2 – Improving feedback practices: the role of learner-teacher relationships and digitally enabled learning design

Facilitators
A/Prof Rola Ajjawi, Deakin University
Prof Elizabeth Molloy, University of Melbourne
A/Prof Kelly Matthews, The University of Queensland

(No limit on participants)

Learner engagement in Australian universities is at an all-time low (QILT, 2020). Fostering interaction in online learning during a pandemic has proven challenging for teaching academics (Matthews et al, 2021). Research consistently highlights the importance of positive learner-teacher interactions for student learning, belonging, and engagement. Good feedback practices play a critical role in student learning and motivation through tailoring the curriculum to a learner’s needs. Good feedback practices show students that teachers care – they are seen, heard, and recognised as knowledge holders able to contribute to the learning of others and take ownership for their own learning.

In this workshop, teaching academics from all disciplines, learning designers, educational technologists, curriculum leaders, academic developers, higher education researchers, and students will come together as learning friends to:

  1. Challenge assumptions of feedback practices and identify changes caused by COVID-19
  2. Re-centre the role of learner-teacher relationships, emotions, community, and belonging in feedback practices and design
  3. Identify processes of feedback co-construction and the place of digital tools in moving toward meaningful learning interactions and community building

Come along and join Rola, Liz, and Kelly in this informative yet informal workshop where we will think differently and cross boundaries to recognise the potential of feedback as a practice that can: improve learning, grow caring learning communities, and bring joy into our classes.

Virtual workshops (afternoon 2:00pm – 4:00pm)

Virtual workshop 3 – Learning from experience to enhance pedagogical approaches to online learning

Facilitators
Prof Anthony Whitty, Australian Catholic University
A/Prof Linda Corrin, Deakin University

(Maximum participants 30)

Recent events have resulted in many changes to how we teach in higher education, especially in terms of the pedagogies we use to engage students online. As teaching staff across universities have been moved out of comfort zones there have been new problems to solve, new scenarios for offering support for students’ learning, but also many examples of interesting and innovative approaches to teaching that can improve the student learning experience. In this workshop we will explore what we’ve learnt from the disrupted educational environment, the move to more flexible teaching models, and how we can build digital and pedagogical fluency to enhance the design and facilitation of learning in the online space. Adopting a world café style, the workshop activities will focus on addressing core learning and teaching challenges and issues sourced from participants prior to the workshop. Participants will work collaboratively in small groups to share experiences and develop solutions to address these issues. The aim is to generate practical guidance for how learning and teaching in online, HyFlex, and blended models can be enhanced, building on what we have learnt in recent times to create better learning experiences for our students. This workshop is suitable for a wide audience including teaching staff, learning designers, learning technologists, academic developers, and researchers and all participants will have a chance to network and engage with others while developing practical solutions that can inform their own practice.

Virtual workshop 4 – University Staff Experiences During and ‘Post’ GlobalPandemic: Lessons Learnt and Prospective Future

Facilitators
Dr Kwong Nui Sim, Auckland University of Technology
Prof Klara Bolander Laksov, Stockholm University
A/Prof Anna Serbati, University of Trento
Dr Bonnie Dean, University of Wollongong

(Maximum participants 32)

Aim: The aim of the workshop is to engage participants in a series of planning ideas/activities resulting from shared staff experiences during and ‘post’ global pandemic.

Audience: This pre-conference workshop is designed for university staff members who are interested to take part in planning ideas/activities based on what we have learnt during the global pandemic. The planning aims to address the prospective future for staff ‘post’ the global pandemic and/or due to any unpredictable disruption in the future.

Prior to the pre-conference workshop: Participants will complete an online activity to share their relevant experiences and interests.

During the pre-conference workshop: Participants will engage in an array of facilitated activities to assist them to network with other like-minded colleagues, and design a series of planning ideas/activities to enhance university staff experiences.

After the pre-conference workshop: Participants will engage in facilitated online meetings and/or activities to share their project progress, and gain feedback from the facilitators.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • expand their professional network;
  • raise their awareness of HERDSA and other relevant professional activities;
  • build capacity in scholarship of staff experiences; and
  • produce a plan to inform an investigation of university staff experiences (i.e., challenges and opportunities of professional relevance).

Abstract

It is still early to predict whether and when research, training, meetings, and other academic activities return back to “normal”, but appears that some changes are here to stay (Mohr, 2021). Key challenges include creating social, emotional, and cognitive engagement, catering to diverse student needs and providing holistic learning experiences (Müller et al, 2021). Research consistently highlights the importance of improving staff experiences for more promising student success. Community practices play a critical role in providing better staff experiences through peer support and collective efforts.

In this workshop, academic developers from different parts of the world will come together as buddies to:

  1. Unpack university staff experiences and identify changes caused by global pandemic
  2. Co-construct the prospects of university staff experiences ‘post’ global pandemic
  3. Recognise the significance of positive and healthy staff experience in moving towards enhanced student success.

Come along and join us in this informative yet informal workshop where we will think differently and cross boundaries to recognise the potential of collaborative thinking and planning as a practice that can: improve university staff experiences, grow professional communities, and bring joy into our daily role.